A Bureaucratic Absurdity

From time to time, one hears the time to wait for a delivery or answer expressed in “business hours.” What? A nurse recently said, “You will receive the test results in 48 to 72 business hours.” Does this mean two to three days or six to nine days? The latter if one assumes that a “business day” is eight hours. What addle-brained bureaucrat came up with this?bureaucracy-park

If it is an attempt to be more precise, it is horribly misguided. Two to three business days from Thursday is crystal clear. It translates into Monday or Tuesday, unless Friday or Monday is a holiday. If expressed as “48 to 72 business hours,” does that mean two to three days if the business is open 24 hours a day, four to six days if the business is open 12 hours a day, or six to nine days if the business is open 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m? Why don’t they express the waiting period in a measure of time that is precise and readily understandable, such as Jovian lunar months or mayfly generations?

In terms of sheer silliness, this rivals the pointless 67-page Pennsylvania regulation on real estate transfers described in “Pennsylvania Commonwealth Bureaucracy.” It’s the kind of false precision sprouted in the fever dream of a pencil-necked desk jockey that gives bureaucracy a bad name.

John B. Payne, Attorney
Garrison LawHouse, PC
Dearborn, Michigan 313.563.4900
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 800.220.7200
law-business.com

©2016 John B. Payne, Attorney

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