Give the ACA a Chance

It is incredible that more than half the U.S. population are against the Affordable Care Act, especially when one third of the country is uninsured or underinsured.  People can be so gullible!  I pointed this out in Suck a Vile Vial.  Pour enough money into advertising and you can sell a two-ounce bottle of caffeinated slime for more than the cost of a gallon of milk.

Before the ACA was passed, I said to a client that the country needed a universal health-care plan.  He had been watching Fox News and listening to talk radio, because he became irate and said, “That would be socialized medicine.  It would be awful.  How could you suggest such a terrible thing.”  I responded, “Gary, you are 42 years old; you are unemployed, living with your father.  You have no health insurance and you cannot get Medicaid because you are not disabled.  How much worse would socialized medicine be for you?”  He was one of the 47 million uninsured, but if he had not died at age 45, he would now be telling his representative to vote to defund “Obamacare.”

Why do so many people want to go back to 2009?  The ACA may not be perfect, but it has to be better than the chaotic hodge-podge of insurance plans, Medicaid, hospital charity care, and unpaid emergency-room visits misnamed a “health-care system” that has plagued us since doctors made house calls driving Model Ts.  Sen. Ted Kennedy and Pres. Richard Nixon (yes, that Richard Nixon, who ended the war in Viet Nam) tried to enact mandatory health insurance for employers and state-run health coverage available to all.  That fizzled and various administrations since Nixon have tried to effect universal health-care coverage in one form or another.  What is the TEA Party plan?  Forty more years of a law-of-the-jungle health care mercantilism.

The ACA may not be perfect, but it is a step in the right direction.  Let’s take it for a test drive and see what the problems are.  Once we see how the program performs, we can decide what reforms are needed.  Dumping the ACA at this point would not set us back four years.  It would set us back 40.

 

John B. Payne, Attorney
Garrison LawHouse, PC
Dearborn, Michigan 313.563.4900
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 800.220.7200
law-business.com
 
©2013 John B. Payne, Attorney
 
 
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